The True Sea

The human mind, old films, literature and podcasts.

Summer reading list

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summer reading listApparently I haven’t shared a reading list with you lovelies for six months. The reason being that I stopped planning ahead what books I was going to read. I haven’t had a lot of time to read lately and I inevitably ended up with a big pile of books next to my bed so I thought I’d share them with you.

Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case by Agatha Christie
I grew up reading my mum’s old Christie books. This instilled in me that there’s nothing as cosy as a nice little British murder mystery.

Elephants Can Remember by Agatha Christie
Another Poirot novel because why not.

The Liar by Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry’s very existence makes me happy. I stumbled across his first novel in a second-hand bookshop and since it’s one of the few of his books that I haven’t read I simply had to pick it up.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
I felt like I should read it because it’s a classic.

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
I do love my Japanese literature. Even so I felt hesitant about reading this book for some reason. I’m glad I changed my mind as I’m halfway through it and love it.

Unknown Pleasures: Inside Joy Division by Peter Hook
Anyone who knows me knows how much I adore Ian Curtis and Joy Division. Yet I didn’t rush to buy this book and it’s just been sitting by my bed ever since I got it. This might seem odd but I’m actually saving it as a treat for when I really need it.

The Code Book: The Secret History of Codes and Code-breaking by Simon Singh
How can anyone not be into breaking codes? I’ve heard good things about this book and I hope it will live up to it’s reputation.

An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales by Oliver Sacks
Oliver Sacks is the funniest, most engaging neurologist around. Fingers crossed that this one is as good as his The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.

I Am a Cat by Sōseki Natsume
This is a classic Japanese book that I’ve been meaning to read for a long, long time. It’s a satirical novel about Japanese society in the Meiji Period as seen through the eyes of a cat. It’s sardonic and funny.summer reading list 2

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